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  • Writer's pictureZachary Epps

If you're interested in investing in an apartment building consider income multipliers for starters.


In simple terms, the income multiplier is a ratio that compares the property's price to its potential rental income.


In this blog post, we'll take a closer look at apartment building income multipliers, how they're calculated, and what they can tell you about a property's investment potential.

What is an Income Multiplier?


An income multiplier is a ratio that compares the price of an apartment building to its potential rental income. This metric is often used in commercial real estate as a way to quickly assess the investment potential of a property.


The income multiplier is calculated by dividing the property's price by its potential rental income. For example, if an apartment building is priced at $1 million and has a potential annual rental income of $100,000, the income multiplier would be 10 ($1,000,000 ÷ $100,000).

How is an Income Multiplier Used?


An income multiplier can be used in a few different ways. For investors, it's a quick way to determine whether a property is priced appropriately based on its income potential. In general, a lower income multiplier indicates a better investment opportunity, as it means the property is generating more income relative to its price.


However, it's important to keep in mind that an income multiplier is just one of many factors to consider when evaluating a potential investment. Other factors like location, vacancy rates, and maintenance costs can all impact the property's overall investment potential.


Calculating the Income Multiplier

To calculate the income multiplier, you'll need to know the property's price and potential rental income. The potential rental income is typically calculated by multiplying the number of units in the building by the average rent for each unit.


For example, if an apartment building has 20 units and the average rent is $1,000 per month, the potential rental income would be $240,000 per year ($1,000 x 20 units x 12 months).

Once you have the property's price and potential rental income, you can divide the price by the income to calculate the income multiplier.


Limitations of Income Multipliers

While income multipliers can be a useful tool for evaluating potential investments, it's important to keep in mind that they have some limitations. For example, income multipliers only take into account potential rental income, not other sources of revenue like parking fees or laundry facilities. They also don't account for expenses like property taxes, insurance, and maintenance costs.


Additionally, income multipliers can vary widely depending on the location and local real estate market conditions. For example, a property in a high-demand area may have a higher income multiplier compared to a similar property in a less desirable location.


In summary, apartment building income multipliers are a useful tool for quickly assessing the investment potential of a property. By comparing the property's price to its potential rental income, investors can get a sense of whether the property is priced appropriately based on its income potential.


However, it's important to keep in mind that income multipliers are just one factor to consider when evaluating a potential investment. Other factors like location, vacancy rates, and maintenance costs can all impact the property's overall investment potential. By taking a holistic approach to evaluating potential investments, investors can make more informed decisions and maximize their returns.


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I’d seriously enjoy having the opportunity to talk to you about your plans if you’re moving, or if you know someone who is considering a move, and needs some straight answers.


Also, I’m never too busy for your referrals. As a real estate professional intent on giving back to the community, my relationship-based approach is exactly what you’ve been looking for in a helpful RE/MAX Professional.


Zachary Epps


GRI®, ABR®, MCNE®, CLHMS®, SRES®, REALTOR®,


RE/MAX Hall of Fame, RE/MAX Platinum Club

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